spn-fandom-breathing-heavily:

westbor0baptistchurch:

“But if you forget to reblog Madame Zeroni, you and your family will be cursed for always and eternity.”

image

not even risking that shit

(via raha-loves-layon)


(via neilnevins)


iiamthetrapp:

dynastylnoire:

mysstique2cus:

dynastylnoire:

thebigblackwolfe:

mormormorgster:

dynastylnoire:

jonesydaking:

trillyvanilli:

86thatshit:

rare-ethnic-images-and-truth:

The Changing Face of America

We’ve become a country where 
race is no longer so black or white.

By Lise Funderburg
Photograph by Martin Schoeller

What is it about the faces on these pages that we find so intriguing? Is it simply that their features disrupt our expectations, that we’re not used to seeing those eyes with that hair, that nose above those lips? Our responses can range from the armchair anthropologist’s benign desire to unravel ancestries and find common ground to active revulsion at group boundaries being violated or, in the language of racist days past, “watered down.”

Out in the world, the more curious (or less polite) among us might approach, asking, “Where are you from?” or “What are you?” We look and wonder because what we see—and our curiosity—speaks volumes about our country’s past, its present, and the promise and peril of its future.

The U.S. Census Bureau has collected detailed data on multiracial people only since 2000, when it first allowed respondents to check off more than one race, and 6.8 million people chose to do so. Ten years later that number jumped by 32 percent, making it one of the fastest growing categories. The multiple-race option has been lauded as progress by individuals frustrated by the limitations of the racial categories established in the late 18th century by German scientist Johann Friedrich Blumenbach, who divided humans into five “natural varieties” of red, yellow, brown, black, and white. Although the multiple-race option is still rooted in that taxonomy, it introduces the factor of self-determination. It’s a step toward fixing a categorization system that, paradoxically, is both erroneous (since geneticists have demonstrated that race is biologically not a reality) and essential (since living with race and racism is). The tracking of race is used both to enforce antidiscrimination laws and to identify health issues specific to certain populations.

The Census Bureau is aware that its racial categories are flawed instruments, disavowing any intention “to define race biologically, anthropologically, or genetically.” And indeed, for most multiple-race Americans, including the people pictured here, identity is a highly nuanced concept, influenced by politics, religion, history, and geography, as well as by how the person believes the answer will be used. “I just say I’m brown,” McKenzi McPherson, 9, says. “And I think, Why do you want to know?” Maximillian Sugiura, 29, says he responds with whatever ethnicity provides a situational advantage. Loyalties figure in too, especially when one’s heritage doesn’t show up in phenotypical facial features, hair, or skin. Yudah Holman, 29, self-identifies as half Thai and half black, but marks Asian on forms and always puts Thai first, “because my mother raised me, so I’m really proud of being Thai.”

Sandra Williams, 46, grew up at a time when the nation still turned on a black-white axis. The 1960 census depicted a country that was still 99 percent black or white, and when Williams was born six years later to parents of mixed black and white ancestry, 17 states still had laws against interracial marriage. In Williams’s western Virginia hometown, there was only one Asian child in her school. To link her own fair skin and hair to her white ancestry, Williams says, would have been seen by blacks as a rejection. And so, though she views race as a social construction, she checks black on the census. “It’s what my parents checked,” she says.

In today’s presumably more accepting world, people with complex cultural and racial origins become more fluid and playful with what they call themselves. On playgrounds and college campuses, you’ll find such homespun terms as Blackanese, Filatino, Chicanese, and Korgentinian. When Joshua Ahsoak, 34, attended college, his heritage of Inupiat (Eskimo) and midwestern Jewish earned him the moniker Juskimo, a term he still uses to describe himself (a practicing Jew who breaks kosher dietary laws not for bacon but for walrus and seal meat).

Tracey Williams Bautista says her seven-year-old son, Yoel Chac Bautista, identifies himself as black when he’s with her, his African-American parent. When he’s with his father, he’ll say Mexican. “We call him a Blaxican,” she jokes, and says she and her husband are raising him in a home where Martin Luther King, Jr., is displayed next to Frida Kahlo. Black relatives warn Williams about the persistence of the one-drop rule, the long-standing practice of seeing anyone with a trace of black “blood” as black. “They say, ‘He may be half, but he’s still the N word.’”

Certainly, race still matters in this country, despite claims that the election of Barack Obama heralded a post-racial world. We may be a pluralist nation by 2060, when the Census Bureau predicts that non-Hispanic whites will no longer be the majority. But head counts don’t guarantee opportunity or wipe out the legacy of Japanese-American internment camps or Jim Crow laws. Whites, on average, have twice the income and six times the wealth of blacks and Hispanics, and young black men are twice as likely as whites to be unemployed. Racial bias still figures into incarceration rates, health outcomes, and national news: A recent Cheerios commercial featuring an interracial family prompted a barrage of negative responses, including claims of white genocide and calls for “DIEversity.”

Both champions and detractors of that ad based their views on what’s known as the eyeball test: A study of brain activity at the University of Colorado at Boulder showed that subjects register race in about one-tenth of a second, even before they discern gender. In May researchers reported that political conservatives are more likely than liberals to categorize ambiguous black-white faces as black. We assign meaning in the blink of an eye.

When people ask Celeste Seda, 26, what she is, she likes to let them guess before she explains her Dominican-Korean background. She points out that even then she has revealed only a fraction of her identity, which includes a Long Island childhood, a Puerto Rican adoptive family, an African-American sister, and a nascent acting career. The attention she gets for her unusual looks can be both flattering and exhausting. “It’s a gift and a curse,” Seda says.

It’s also, for the rest of us, an opportunity. If we can’t slot people into familiar categories, perhaps we’ll be forced to reconsider existing definitions of race and identity, presumptions about who is us and who is them. Perhaps we’ll all end up less parsimonious about who we feel connected to as we increasingly come across people like Seda, whose faces seem to speak that resounding line from Walt Whitman’s “Song of Myself”:

“I am large, I contain multitudes.”

rare-ethnic-images-and-truth.tumblr.com/archive

Where the darker ones tho?

I’m glad this is a thing. Growing up with white skin but having the physical traits of a mixed child was shitty in a social setting. Every. Fucking. Time. I went to school or summer camp the whole you’re not black you’re just an ugly white girl thing would blow up in my face. Having someone tell you what you are every day growing up and now being an adult and seeing this, it’s beautiful.

Yoooo this is actually BS tho. Because most African Americans are mixed race and yet we still are “Black”. Race mixing isn’t a new phenomenon at all. Interracial relationships have existed since Egypt. The whole idea that most people will look like this in the not so distant future is unrealistic because it would have happened already. Plus you can’t predict how a mixed person will look. Mixed people can look like Mariah Carey to Barrack Obama to Naomi Campbell to Tyson Beckford. 

This whole, mixed people are going to save the world by being light skinned with green eyes and 3 C hair thing has got to stop. It’s dangerous as hell.  And it is very naive, if not violent to suggest that if everyone were medium/light brown their still wouldn’t be any racism or prejudice.

It’s so irritating how people can somehow spin a positive article in the growth of our nation into another darkskin vs lightskin debate. The article in no way is saying “every person is going to have lightskin and green eyes with curly hair” it’s embracing the cultural changes over century’s of segregation and oppression, which is a beautiful thing.

If all you got from this commentary was that folks were trying to turn this into a dark skin vs light skin thing you need to unfollow me.

Exactly.

The point I was trying to make is in the minds of many (mostly white people) the light skinned, racially ambiguous mixed person is the solution to centuries of racism. But they are wrong. Race mixing and blending will produce people that are going to be darker and lighter than those represented. Features that are found within non white races will still be prominent. 

There will be ways to distinguish who doesn’t look like the ideal hybrid person and discrimination accordingly. Mixed raced people on this site will tell you that they have been discriminated against for those very reasons.

Also, in families of color you will see children of various skin tones and features  although both parents are black due to mixing that took place generations ago….This article and the photos used as an example convey a world where dark skinned people do not exist.

I’m even willing to wager that the darkest person they have there maybe what “Dark” looks like, when you consider what “Dark” is in many drug store make up aisles. And what nude is to many panty hose, shoe, and bra companies.

And it frightens me when folks make it seem that people that are around my color will not make it into the “future”. The implications are terrifying! Either we 1. “Go extinct” or 2. Are continuously and forcibly “bred” with lighter-complected folks to make this happen. One of these, I do believe, has already occurred (with slave rape), and with the biases that the media and colorists pass along, the other may occur, as folks stand their ground against “suspicious”, “young”, “intimidating” youths with too much melanin for their own good.

It saddens me that folks still applaud articles like this, as if racism and colorism will cease to exist just because everyone “has a little bit of everything”. Nope. Try again. Fix the ACTUAL PROBLEM, not the “symptom”!

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

I wanted to reblog until everyone started screaming racism

That last comment doe


unusual-cube:

The bible says a lot more about caring for the poor than abortion and gay rights, but somehow you don’t see the religious right championing for welfare programs.

(via iiamthetrapp)




(via neilnevins)


So gay marriage has been legal in England for almost an hour.

brettball:

In that time the fires of hell have burned through ground. My house collapsed. All babies have become homosexuals with no concept of morality. God has disowned us. Strange lizard men have started taking over parliament. The undead have woken and are on a mission of destruction. My eyeballs have burst. And ducks are speaking latin. 

(via raha-loves-layon)


smuppetbuttfluff:

veedeerest:

leanonberger:

summersxdelight:

durianseeds:


This is Alana Thompson aka Honey Boo Boo (Child).
She received $1700 dollars in donations from fans all around the world. Instead of keeping it for herself, using it for pageants, or for something else, she purchased toys for needy children in her area.
Her family gives to the needy AND supports equality for gays? Fuck you to whoever disses her. She’s 7 and shows more compassion than most people three times her age.

She’s my queen.

That is totally for publicity!

oh my god you’re right
let’s ignore this canned food drive they held too

oh right and this? $1300 in cash donated by fans to buy just THIS image of all these toys?
and oh shi-

this extreme amount of TOYS AND FOOD donated in a SINGLE night via their Christmas meet and greets with Santa (which Sugarbear dresses as Santa in the sweltering Georgia winter heat for hours at a time)
is all
publicity
and the fact that they take pictures of themselves with the *ALL* letters and trinkets their fans send them?

oh gosh, yes, this is totally publicity

Seriously, no one has any reason to talk crap on this family. They have never done a single thing wrong and look at all of the good they do for their community.

People hate them because they are Southern, overweight, and successful while still managing to be wonderful people.

smuppetbuttfluff:

veedeerest:

leanonberger:

summersxdelight:

durianseeds:

This is Alana Thompson aka Honey Boo Boo (Child).

She received $1700 dollars in donations from fans all around the world. Instead of keeping it for herself, using it for pageants, or for something else, she purchased toys for needy children in her area.

Her family gives to the needy AND supports equality for gays? Fuck you to whoever disses her. She’s 7 and shows more compassion than most people three times her age.

She’s my queen.

That is totally for publicity!

oh my god you’re right

let’s ignore this canned food drive they held too

oh right and this? $1300 in cash donated by fans to buy just THIS image of all these toys?

and oh shi-

this extreme amount of TOYS AND FOOD donated in a SINGLE night via their Christmas meet and greets with Santa (which Sugarbear dresses as Santa in the sweltering Georgia winter heat for hours at a time)

is all

publicity

and the fact that they take pictures of themselves with the *ALL* letters and trinkets their fans send them?

oh gosh, yes, this is totally publicity

Seriously, no one has any reason to talk crap on this family. They have never done a single thing wrong and look at all of the good they do for their community.

People hate them because they are Southern, overweight, and successful while still managing to be wonderful people.

(via iiamthetrapp)


simplesidewaysglance:

There’s not a day that goes by that I don’t laugh at this f ucking picture

image

(via neilnevins)


michaelmay:

Home of the Bigfoot Wiener

michaelmay:

Home of the Bigfoot Wiener

(via neilnevins)


lorddirkstrider:

lorddirkstrider:

remember the good days

THIS GOT THREE THOUSAND NOTES IN TWO FUCKING HOURS HOLY SHIT

lorddirkstrider:

lorddirkstrider:

remember the good days

THIS GOT THREE THOUSAND NOTES IN TWO FUCKING HOURS HOLY SHIT

(via somethingoutsideyourwindow)


okaymoose:

shoresoftheshadowlands:

aperfectillusion:

lettersfromdua:

aperfectillusion:

Step 1: Go someplace public with your laptop.

Step 2: Click HERE

Step 3: Press f11

Step 4: Start typing frantically.

Step 5: Make sure other people see your screen.

Step 6: ???????

Step 7: Profit

it helps if you roll your neck a few times, grunt and crack your knuckles. Trust me. 

Holy fucking shit. This has 80 thousand notes?!?!

THIS IS WAY MORE ENTERTAINING THAN IT SHOULD BE

o H MY GDO

(via neilnevins)


(via neilnevins)


the-phantasticfoursome:

Just hold on we’re going home

the-phantasticfoursome:

Just hold on we’re going home

(via growing-old-is-getting-old)